Aug 17, 2009

What a BORING Summer

So this here ol blog just aint seen much action this year, and that is because I haven't done much besides work my ass off after selling the beemer several months ago.

We still have the boat and enjoy an occasional trip around Percy Priest Lake, but frankly, I can't stand the hot sweaty summers and the nasty bugs that permeate this area, so we hang inside air conditioned computer rooms and spend our time surfing, writing and chillin, literally.

We've got the boat up for sale and it's a helluva deal, too, and we're planning on getting a couple of new motorsickles when the ol girl sells.  Unfortunately, its been a lousy summer for selling anything, so we aren't holding our breaths that we'll be back in the wind anytime soon.

Sigh.

Jan 30, 2009

Bikeless Coming Into Springtime!

Well hell.  It's been more than a decade since I've entered a springtime without two wheels to roll around on.  In fact, it's probably been closer to two decades since I've been without a motorsickle, maybe even longer.

I sold the Beemer and the little Rebel about a week ago and the garage is sure a strange place to enter right now.

But they both had to go as I needed to dump all my debt, and now the little woman and I can concentrate on getting something more suitable to urban commando cruising.

There just wasn't a lot of riding to do in the Nashville area that justified pushing that 865 pound behemoth around and honestly, it was often a chore to have to hassle with on a daily basis as far as city riding was concerned.

Not sure what we'll end up with at this point; nothing's out of the question and I'm actually leaning towards an enduro, if you can believe it.

I know the wife's got her eye on an 800 shadow or vstar, but bmw has an 800 that is just too damned cool for words!  

Of course, there are dozens of awesome and inexpensive rides that I think will be coming available this summer, as all those folks who raced to get a motorcycle last year when gas hit $5/gallon put it away in the garage when gas dropped below $3 and haven't had it out since.

That's a lot of money sitting idle in someone's garage and I just bet there'll be a sudden glut of scoots on the market this year when all those folks decide motorsicklin just wasn't as fun, economical, safe, and/or needed as they'd originally thought.

So stay tuned, we still have the boat, although it is for sale, but bikes will definitely be returning to our garage soon.

Nov 30, 2008

Americans drove 9.6 billion fewer miles in July this year compared with last

And we'll be driving even less when prices rise again - and they will, you can count on that.  
What may be different this time however, is that hopefully by the time that happens again, enough peeps will have switched to cheaper or alternate forms of travel that the price increases won't have nearly the impact.  
Motorsickles, trikes, scooters, and bitchin new "transportation designs" will be coming out in droves over the next few years, mark our words...



Essay

An Ode to Oil

America's oil dependency has some benefits. Roger Howard on how the diminishing resource acts as a source of stability, and forces countries to work together.

In its collective mindset, every nation not only harbors aspirations, fears and delusions but also conjures rogues, villains and scapegoats upon which it vents its anguish, insecurities and resentments. And for many Americans, one such villain is a highly prized commodity.


Oil is, after all, a primary source of man-made global warming, while spillages and drilling have sometimes inflicted lethal environmental damage. Despite the sharp falls of recent months, dramatic price rises have also underwritten every postwar global recession, including the current economic malaise.

Oil lies at the heart of bitter civil wars in several parts of the world, notably West Africa, while several governments have recently been scrambling to stake their claims over the newly discovered deposits of the Arctic. Above all, it is often regarded as America's strategic Achilles' heel.

President-elect Barack Obama has promised to end U.S. "foreign oil dependency," claiming that it can be used as a "weapon" that allows overseas governments, particularly "unstable, undemocratic governments...to wield undue influence over America's national security." Last weekend, Mr. Obama announced his plan to create a major economic stimulus package, including spending on alternate energy.

Alarming as these scenarios are, they disguise the true picture, one that is really much more complicated and much more reassuring. While there are, of course, circumstances in which oil can exacerbate tensions and be a source of conflict, it can also act as a peacemaker and source of stability. So to identify America's "foreign oil dependency" as a source of vulnerability and weakness is just too neat and easy.

This identification wholly ignores the dependency of foreign oil producers on their consumers, above all on the world's largest single market -- the United States. Despite efforts to diversify their economies, all of the world's key exporters are highly dependent on oil's proceeds and have always lived in fear of the moment that has now become real -- when global demand slackens and prices fall. The recent, dramatic fall in price per barrel -- now standing at around $54, less than four months after peaking at $147 -- perfectly exemplifies the producers' predicament.
So even if such a move were possible in today's global market, no oil exporter is ever in a position to alienate its customers. Supposed threats of embargoes ring hollow because no producer can assume that its own economy will be damaged any less than that of any importing country. What's more, a supply disruption would always seriously damp global demand.

Even in the best of times, a prolonged price spike could easily tip the world into economic recession, prompt consumers to shake off their gasoline dependency, or accelerate a scientific drive to find alternative fuels. Fearful of this "demand destruction" when crude prices soared so spectacularly in the summer, the Saudis pledged to pump their wells at full tilt. It seems that their worst fears were realized: Americans drove 9.6 billion fewer miles in July this year compared with last, according to the Department of Transportation.

Instead, the dependency of foreign oil producers on their customers plays straight into America's strategic hands. Washington is conceivably in a position to hold producers to ransom by threatening to accelerate a drive to develop or implement alternative fuels, realizing the warning once uttered by Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Yamani, the former Saudi oil minister who pointed out that "the Stone Age did not end for lack of stone." Back in 1973, as they protested at Washington's stance on the Arab-Israeli dispute, Middle East producers were in a position to impose an oil embargo on the Western world. But a generation later, technological advances, and the strength of public and scientific concern about global warming, have turned the tables.

The United States has powerful political leverage over producers because it holds the key to future oil supply as well as market demand. The age of "easy oil" is over, and as fears grow that oil is becoming harder to get, so too will the dependency of producers on increasingly sophisticated Western technology and expertise.

Such skills will be particularly important in two key areas of oil production. One is finding and extracting offshore deposits, like the massive reserves reckoned to be under the Caspian and Arctic seas, or in Brazil's recently discovered Tupi field. The other is prolonging the lifespan of declining wells through enhanced "tertiary" recovery. Because Western companies have a clear technological edge over their global competitors in these hugely demanding areas, Washington exerts some powerful political leverage over exporters, many of whom openly anticipate the moment when their production peaks before gradually starting to decline.

Syria illustrates how this leverage can work. Although oil has been the primary source of national income for more than 40 years, production has recently waned dramatically: Output is now nearly half of the peak it reached in the mid-1990s, when a daily output of 600,000 barrels made up 60% of gross domestic product, and can barely sustain rapidly growing domestic demand fueled by a very high rate of population growth. With enough foreign investment Syrian oil could be much more productive and enduring, but Washington has sent foreign companies, as well as American firms, a tough message to steer well clear. It is not surprising, then, that the Damascus regime regards a rapprochement with the U.S. as a political lifeline and in recent months has shown signs of a new willingness to compromise.

The same predicament confronted Libya's Col. Moammar Gadhafi, who first offered to surrender weapons of mass destruction during secret negotiations with U.S. officials in May 1999. Facing a deepening economic crisis that he could not resolve without increasing the production of his main export, oil, Col. Gadhafi was prepared to bow to Washington's demands and eventually struck a path-breaking accord in December 2003. Col. Gadhafi had been the "Mad Dog" of the Reagan years, but oil's influence had initiated what President Bush hailed as "the process of rejoining the community of nations."

Oil could also help the outside world frustrate the nuclear ambitions of Iran, whose output is likely to steadily decline over the coming years unless it has access to the latest Western technology. Many wells are aging rapidly and the Iranians cannot improve recovery rates, or exploit their new discoveries, unless Washington lifts sanctions, which have been highly successful in deterring international investment.

Sometimes the markets will prove at least as effective as any American sanctions in keeping a tight political rein on oil producers. For example, when Russian forces attacked South Ossetia and Georgia on Aug. 8, Russia's stock market -- of which energy stocks comprise 60% -- plunged by nearly 7%, and within a week capital outflow reached a massive $16 billion, suddenly squeezing domestic credit while the ruble collapsed in value. A month later, the country was facing its worst crisis since the default of August 1998. But the future of the oil sector is so dependent on attracting massive foreign investment, and the wider Russian economy so heavily dependent on petrodollars, that the Kremlin simply can't afford to unnecessarily unnerve investors.

Today the markets know that Russia needs at least $1 trillion in investment if it is to maintain, let alone increase, its oil production. Just five years ago, output was increasing so fast -- energy giants Yukos and Sibneft were posting annual production gains of 20% -- that even the Saudis were worried about their own global dominance. But in the past year Russian oil production has started to wane. Leonid Fedun, a top official at Lukoil, Russia's No. 2 oil producer, admitted back in April that national output had peaked and was unlikely to return to 2007 levels "in my lifetime" and that "the period of intense oil production [growth] is over." Without foreign money and expertise to extract offshore oil and prolong the lifespan of existing wells, Russian production will fall dramatically.

Syria illustrates how this leverage can work. Although oil has been the primary source of national income for more than 40 years, production has recently waned dramatically: Output is now nearly half of the peak it reached in the mid-1990s, when a daily output of 600,000 barrels made up 60% of gross domestic product, and can barely sustain rapidly growing domestic demand fueled by a very high rate of population growth. With enough foreign investment Syrian oil could be much more productive and enduring, but Washington has sent foreign companies, as well as American firms, a tough message to steer well clear. It is not surprising, then, that the Damascus regime regards a rapprochement with the U.S. as a political lifeline and in recent months has shown signs of a new willingness to compromise.

The same predicament confronted Libya's Col. Moammar Gadhafi, who first offered to surrender weapons of mass destruction during secret negotiations with U.S. officials in May 1999. Facing a deepening economic crisis that he could not resolve without increasing the production of his main export, oil, Col. Gadhafi was prepared to bow to Washington's demands and eventually struck a path-breaking accord in December 2003. Col. Gadhafi had been the "Mad Dog" of the Reagan years, but oil's influence had initiated what President Bush hailed as "the process of rejoining the community of nations."

Oil could also help the outside world frustrate the nuclear ambitions of Iran, whose output is likely to steadily decline over the coming years unless it has access to the latest Western technology. Many wells are aging rapidly and the Iranians cannot improve recovery rates, or exploit their new discoveries, unless Washington lifts sanctions, which have been highly successful in deterring international investment.

Sometimes the markets will prove at least as effective as any American sanctions in keeping a tight political rein on oil producers. For example, when Russian forces attacked South Ossetia and Georgia on Aug. 8, Russia's stock market -- of which energy stocks comprise 60% -- plunged by nearly 7%, and within a week capital outflow reached a massive $16 billion, suddenly squeezing domestic credit while the ruble collapsed in value. A month later, the country was facing its worst crisis since the default of August 1998. But the future of the oil sector is so dependent on attracting massive foreign investment, and the wider Russian economy so heavily dependent on petrodollars, that the Kremlin simply can't afford to unnecessarily unnerve investors.

Today the markets know that Russia needs at least $1 trillion in investment if it is to maintain, let alone increase, its oil production. Just five years ago, output was increasing so fast -- energy giants Yukos and Sibneft were posting annual production gains of 20% -- that even the Saudis were worried about their own global dominance. But in the past year Russian oil production has started to wane. Leonid Fedun, a top official at Lukoil, Russia's No. 2 oil producer, admitted back in April that national output had peaked and was unlikely to return to 2007 levels "in my lifetime" and that "the period of intense oil production [growth] is over." Without foreign money and expertise to extract offshore oil and prolong the lifespan of existing wells, Russian production will fall dramatically.


Russia's oil, in other words, acted as peacemaker. This seems paradoxical for it has sometimes been said that the Kremlin's attack on South Ossetia and Georgia was prompted by an ambition to seize control of local pipelines. But although this was an aggravating factor, it was not the primary cause because Russian leaders would have felt threatened -- reasonably or not -- by the presence of NATO in what they regard as their own backyard even if the region was not an energy hub. They were also reportedly eyeing Ukraine, which has no petroleum deposits of its own and poses no threat to the dominance of their giant energy company, Gazprom.

Oil can also act as a peacemaker and source of stability because many conflicts, in almost every part of the world, can threaten a disruption of supply and instantly send crude prices spiraling. Despite the recent price falls, the market is still vulnerable to sudden supply shocks, and a sharp increase would massively affect the wider global economy. This would have potentially disastrous social and political results, just as in the summer many countries, including France, Nepal and Indonesia, were rocked by violent protests at dramatic price increases in gasoline.

Haunted by the specter of higher oil prices at a time of such economic fragility, many governments have a very strong incentive to use diplomacy, not force, to resolve their own disputes, and to help heal other people's. This is true not just of oil consumers but producers, which would also be keen not to watch global demand stifled by such price spikes.

Consider the events of last fall, when the Ankara government was set to retaliate against the Iraq-based Kurdish guerrillas who had killed 17 Turkish soldiers and taken others prisoner in a cross-border raid on Oct. 21, 2007. Even the mere prospect of such an attack sent the price of a barrel surging to a then record high of $85 because the markets knew that the insurgents could respond by damaging a key pipeline which moves 750,000 barrels of oil across Turkish territory every day.

Not surprisingly, the Bush administration pushed very hard to prevent a Turkish invasion of northern Iraq -- State Department spokesman Sean McCormack aptly described the frenzy of diplomatic activity as a "full-court press" -- not just to avoid shattering the vestiges of Iraq's political structure but also to stabilize oil prices. In the end it was American pressure that averted a major incursion, allowing crude prices to quickly ease. And the Turks would also have been aware that any invasion could have prompted retaliatory damage on the oil pipeline, losing them vast transit fees.

In general, oil is such a vital commodity, for consumers, producers and intermediaries alike, that it represents a meeting point for all manner of different interests. Sometimes it offers an opportunity for competitors and rivals to resolve differences, as in March 1995, when Iranian President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani tried to break deadlock with Washington by offering a technically very demanding oil contract to Conoco. Today, the symbiotic energy requirements of Europe and Russia allows scope to improve mutual relations, not least if European governments act in unison to impose the rules of the European Union's energy charter on Moscow. Oil also gives consumers a chance to penalize, or tempt, international miscreants, just as U.S. sanctions are forcing the Tehran regime to reassess its cost-benefit analysis of building the bomb.

What cannot go unchallenged is a facile equation between oil on the one hand, and war, bloodshed and, in America's particular case, strategic vulnerability on the other. For oil, fortunately, can often be our guardian.

Roger Howard is the author of "The Oil Hunters: Exploration and Espionage in the Middle East, 1880-1939," published by Continuum.

Nov 2, 2008

Time for a Comeback!

If it's got a motor on two wheels, I want to ride it!

Homemade Motorized Bike Pays Tribute to Motorcycles of Yesteryear

By Chuck Squatriglia Write to the Author   
11.01.08 
 
James Hough is a lawyer by profession but a gearhead at heart. He’s always tinkering with engines and building things from scratch. About a year ago, he combined the two passions to create the Houghmade Cycle Works 71, a motorized bicycle that pays homage to the racing motorcycles of the early 20th century.
"I had been looking for a project and saw online that someone had put an engine on an old Schwinn," Hough says. "I was inspired by that and thought it would be a fun project, an outlet for my desire to build. I thought it would be fun to ride around the neighborhood and to run errands. The 100-plus mpg didn't hurt."
Click through the gallery to check out the tech behind this cruiser on steroids.
Left:
Hough drew inspiration from the board-track racers that sped around steeply banked wood tracks called motordromes — especially the 1911 Harley Davidson "Silent Grey Fellow" and the leaf-sprung Indian motorcycles of that era. The Houghmade bike's gas tank copies the tank found on the 1919 Excelsior OHC that some consider the most advanced motorcycle of its day.
Photo: James Hough
1 - 9 of 9 images

Aug 30, 2008

HD Turns 105

Woulda loved to have gone, even if I'm not a diehard fan....



HD Homepage


Miller Park, home of the Milwaukee Brewers, serves as a backdrop for the Harley Owners Group 25th Anniversary celebration.
Miller Park, home of the Milwaukee Brewers, serves as a backdrop for the Harley Owners Group (H.O.G.)
25th Anniversary celebration.




  • 2009 Harley-Davidsons - First Ride


  • 2009 Harley-Davidson CVO - First Rides



  • The Wall of Ink had pictures of people's tattoos that attendees got to check out and vote for their favorites.
    The Wall of Ink had pictures of people's tattoos that attendees got to check out and vote for their favorites.

    Somebody forgot to tell Bubba Blackwell that you're not supposed to pop wheelies like that on a big bagger.
    Somebody forgot to tell Bubba Blackwell that you're not supposed to pop wheelies like that on a big bagger.

    It wouldn't be a Harley party without the iconic Willie G.
    It wouldn't be a Harley party without the iconic Willie G.

    Billy Bob Thornton may be better known for roles like 'Slingblade', but his primary passion now is music.
    Billy Bob Thornton may be better known for roles like 'Slingblade', but his primary passion now is music.

    Can you spot the Foo Fighter in this picture?
    Can you spot the Foo Fighter in this picture?

    Harley-Davidson's 105th Anniversary
    8/29/2008
    By Bryan Harley

    Banners and billboards proclaim 'Welcome Bikers.' Streets have been cordoned off as yellow 'Motorcycle Parking Only' signs surround businesses and hotels. A vibrato of V-Twins conduct an impromptu symphony of cylinders and pistons that resonate throughout the city day and night. The red carpet has been rolled out in Milwaukee as thousands of motorcyclists have made the pilgrimage home to visit the likes of Juneau Avenue and Pilgrim Rd., bringing their bikes back to where many of them were born as Harley-Davidson

    's 105th Anniversary Party kicks it in high gear.

    My day started with a trip over to the place where it all started, the red brick building that is Harley-Davidson's headquarters at Juneau Ave. A black banner on the side of the University Building said it all - 'Juneau Avenue Welcomes You Home.' I did my best to not act like a tourist, but couldn't resist having my picture taken in front of the steps to the Office and Visitors entrance. I was not alone. Two couples speaking in Scandinavian rolled their bike up right behind me for a quick photo op. Another group waved their orange banner overhead, proudly representing the Beijing chapter of H.O.G. owners. What a thrill it must have been for them. Forget the Olympics, they were at the birthplace of Harley-Davidson and looked damned proud to be there.

    I picked up the keys to a beautiful black and pewter 2009 Electra Glide Classic from Harley's L.A. Fleet Manager, Alan Barsi, and loaded up my camera equipment. He chided me about putting the keys in my pocket with a wry smile. Seems like Alan's got a good memory. (I lost the keys to the 2008 Ultra Classic on the first day when I was testing it and had to punch in the security code to manually override the theft prevention system until the test was finished.) Keys secured, I set out for Miller Park, where the Harley Owners Group (H.O.G.) was having its 25th Anniversary party.

    There is definitely a brotherhood that comes with owning a Harley-Davidson that is unmatched by any other manufacturer. Worn leather vests with patches and pins were the proper attire of the day. Winged H.O.G. patches in the middle of the vests were global in origin, and I saw riders who had traveled from as far away as South Africa and Belgium to be a part of the celebration. Harley-Davidson is indeed a universal language. Unlike other rallies, there was a spirit of camaraderie that filled the air. A good time was the bottom line, and the love of Harley-Davidson motorcycles was the common bond.

    It was an almost carnival-like atmosphere. A woman in an orange H-D t-shirt and brown leather vest hovered above the crowd on stilts, stopping here and there to entertain the crowd with her juggling skills. A pair of brave women climbed on the mechanical bull and wagered who could ride longer. Blue ribbons hung off handlebars from winners in the Ride In show. Harley-Davidson riders of tomorrow took turns spinning laps around a makeshift track, banging into hay bales and crashing into one another and laughing as they rode miniature motorized bikes. The sound of chainsaws drew a crowd that watched as the ECHO National Carving Team chiseled and carved wonderful pieces of art out of their wooden canvases.

    I followed my ears to the sound of an engine revving and caught the tail end of Bubba Blackwell's stunt riding show. The Buell American Devil was working the crowd by ripping off standing wheelies on a V-Rod before hopping aboard a big Dyna and slinging it around the course, backing it in like he was on a supermoto bike. After plenty of tire-smokin' action, the real crowd-pleaser was when Blackwell mounted a big bagger and got the bike almost vertical, ripping off the best wheelies I've seen on a bike that is not built for such hooliganism. Not a bad way to demonstrate what the TC 96 is capable of.

    It was hot and humid, so I headed over to the Harley-Davidson Media tent to grab a drink and some shade. Famed motorcycling photographer Michael Lichter was there downloading pics to his laptop. I talked with Paul James about the James Gang Racing/Hoban Brothers team and the Moto-ST series. Paul can ride the hell out of a Buell, and his team sits in second place in their division with two races left, so I wished him luck. While I was there, who shows up but the venerable Willie G. himself. He had just gotten off the Harley Stage after presenting an award bearing his name and was gearing up for a police-escorted ride to his next gig. He runs a frenetic schedule for a man in his 70s, and does so with great aplomb. Karen Davidson, great-granddaughter of William A. Davidson was there too, looking good as ever, and joined Willie G. for the ride. I felt a little foolish standing next to Lichter clicking off pictures with my point-and-shoot, auto-focus photography skills. I still managed to get a decent shot of Willie G. and his procession as they rode off, though.

    Refreshed and ready for more, I headed over to the stage under the tent at the Beer Garden. Joan Jett and the Blackhearts were rockin' it. Even though she's been on the music scene since I was in high school (I won't tell you how long ago that was), she still looks like she can kick some serious ass. She looked great in her black leather pants and bikini top. But even more impressive was here musical abilities. She was shredding on guitar, and her vocals were studio-quality. Not many people sound as good in person as they do on the radio, but Joan and the Blackhearts had heads bobbing, hands clapping, and was definitely a crowd-pleaser. When she struck the first chords of 'I love Rock and Roll', a rousing ovation rose from the audience.

    As I left Miller Park, Billy Bob Thornton was entertaining the audience on the Harley Stage with his band. Not bad for an actor, but I still like him better as 'Slingblade.' Gotta give him props though. He did, after all, hook up with Angelina Jolie before Brad Pitt. The crowd was in to it though.

    As I got back to the parking lot, I was totally lost. I've never seen so many Harleys in one spot in my life. Even though I made note of the section I parked in, I had ridden straight from Juneau to Miller Park and couldn't remember exactly what the graphics and colors the Electra Glide were. After about twenty minutes of wandering aimlessly and trying my key in the ignition of two of the wrong motorcycles, I finally found the right one.

    With so many bikes in town, parking is cutthroat, so instead of heading back to Miller Park to see Kid Rock I opted to walk to a street party that was close to the Hyatt Regency downtown where I am staying. They had closed down a city block and threw up a stage in the middle of the street and I wanted to check out the Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. Amongst the cigar smoke and the smell of spilled beer, the group Tea Leaf Green finished off their set. In between bands, I talked to a father and son who were there, the dad wearing a Milwaukee chapter H.O.G. vest while the son's patch declared that he was a member from Hawaii. On their upper left shoulder they wore the same patch that said 'Harley-Davidson Baghdad , Since 2003.' His son had just gotten back from a tour in Iraq and had flown to Milwaukee to celebrate with his father. At that moment, the significance of the event going on around me was put into perspective.

    The Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, dressed in black from head to toe and smoking cigarettes while they played, put on an energetic set. I'm sure that some of the older generation of attendees were unfamiliar with their music, but they still seemed to dig it. I was near the left side of the stage watching the show when I see this guy with scruffy, long dark hair walk up to the amps and place his ear against the speaker. I'm thinking to myself 'That dude's messed up' and then get a look at the guy's face. It was David Grohl, lead singer of the Foo Fighters. Grohl mingled into the crowd near the front of the stage and banged his head and swigged his Miller Genuine Draft as the Black Rebel Motorcycle Club laid down a groove. I tried to get close for a picture, but Grohl's bodyguard was giving me the evil eye like I was a member of the Stalkerazzi. After a few songs they cut out, and I followed suit. It was late and I was tired. Besides, I needed to rest because I'm headed to see the Foo Fighters tonight. If I see Grohl's bodyguard again, he's for sure going to think I'm a stalker. I'll let you know how it goes in tomorrow's report.

    Aug 24, 2008

    Cuban "Scooter Trash" Putt Some Bitchin Bikes...

    The BBC had these pics on their site today and they are definitely worth sharing....

    Harley Davidson motorbikesBikers on the road, HavanaBiker in the cememtery, Havana

    Biking convention, Havana

    Aug 10, 2008

    Why Motorcycling Should Be Taken Damned Seriously

    As my wife ventures out for the first time on her own new motorcycle (pics coming shortly), it pays to remember a few things about motorcycle fatalities:

    The most frequent victim is a young white male on a sportbike.

    Typically, they have less than 10K experience total on motorcycles and less than 5K on the bike that kills them.

    The accident is usually within 5 miles of their home.

    Speed is the cause of the initial loss of control.

    Alcohol is often involved.

    Drugs are often involved (especially cannabis).

    They don't come back....


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    Home --> Fauxtography --> Accidents --> Tulsa Motorcycle Crash

    Tulsa Motorcycle Crash

    Claim: Photographs show a motorcyclist who crashed into the back of a truck.

    Status: True.

    Example: [Collected via e-mail, June 2007]

    By Lackland AFB in San Antonio....

    This crash was at 169 near Admiral exit last week.

    How would you like to be a truck driver, walk around back and see THAT hangin from the ass end of your truck.

    They said dude hit the back of the truck at about 120mph.

    Yellow/Roadway truck Accident

    These are pictures from a motorcycle accident last week on Highway 169 here in Tulsa. The guy was going over 125 mph around 2 am when he hit the back of the Yellow truck. The truck was going normal speed and did not know what had happened. He was drug approx a mile before the truck stopped. Highway 169 is known for late night speed driving and trick driving of motorcycles. This guy's friend was killed 1 week before this on his motorcycle going 120+ on Highway 169. Please be aware of what you're doing at all times..... and watch your speed.

    Click photo to enlarge Click photo to enlarge
    Click photo to enlarge Click photo to enlarge
    Click photo to enlarge Click photo to enlarge
    Click photo to enlarge

    Origins: The fatal accident depicted above took place on U.S. 169 near Tulsa, Oklahoma, during the early morning hours of 17 April 2007. The motorcyclist, 26-year-old Brandon Lee White of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, was traveling at an estimated 120+ mph when his motorcycle struck the back of a tractor-trailer rig.

    According to the Tulsa World:
    Police said the truck driver reported hearing a bump and then seeing debris from the motorcycle going past him. When he managed to pull over, he saw that a man was embedded in the back of his trailer.

    White was dead at the scene.
    Brandon's family said that they hoped his unfortunate death at least would help to bring attention to the issue of motorcycle safety:
    "If I can save one mother, one father from going through what I've gone through, then it's worthwhile," said Broken Arrow resident Dennis White,

    Brandon White's father. "I can't be mad, but I know I have to do something. I've got to make a positive out of this."

    Despite the hurt, the family members said they hope something good — a review of motorcycle safety laws — comes out of the recent death.

    Helmet requirement laws, harsher penalties for speeding on a motorcycle, and community-based services to decrease drunken driving are among measures about which the family hopes the two young men's deaths spark a discussion.

    Taking away a rider's motorcycle and motorcycle license for going a certain amount over the speed limit would be one way to curb speeding on bikes, said the elder White, who has ridden motorcycles for several years.

    "That's the only thing that would make me think — that I'm going to lose it (his motorcycle)," he said. "I'm not a lawmaker, but I'm a biker, and that's the only thing that would work."

    White said clubs that don't serve alcohol would go a long way toward helping reduce drunken-driving deaths for youths by providing them a hangout without the temptation of drinking and driving.

    "We've got to do something to save these kids," he said. "We've got to do something to support them."
    A few inaccuracies have crept into the text accompanying forwarded versions of these pictures. A 2008 variant carried the closing legend "He lived. Wear your helmet!", but unfortunately Brandon Lee did not survive the accident despite his wearing a helmet. Also, the friend of Brandon's who "was killed 1 week before this on his motorcycle going 120+ on Highway 169" referenced in the second example above was 21-year-old Devin Seigal, who was killed in a similar motorcycle accident five days after Brandon's death (and had, in fact, attended Brandon's funeral).

    Last updated: 10 March 2008

    The URL for this page is http://www.snopes.com/photos/accident/tulsacrash.asp

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    Sources Sources:
    Adcock, Clifton. "Motorcycle Focus: 2 Deaths Highlight Safety Issues."
    Tulsa World. 30 April 2007.
    Tulsa World. "BA Motorcyclist Topping 120 MPH Slams into Truck, Dies."
    18 April 2007.
    Tulsa World. "Motorcycle Deaths: Two Riders Felt Need for Speed, Friend Says."
    18 April 2007.